Skip to main content

Level 6 Review


We often find that the things we want are not always founded on the root needs that drive us. Whether learned through trial and error or the frustrating realization that our behavior consistently leads to unsatisfactory results, we learn that discovering what we really want can go a lot deeper than what is first conceived.

The question then becomes, how can we bypass the 'trial and error' phase and get to the root of our motivation?

The Level 6 Review can be an effective tool to dig through those initial thoughts and desires. It can help us understand what our motivations are and the circumstances that drive them.

It’s a simple exercise, in fact children are very good at it especially between the ages of 2 and 4. When you think of something you want, you ask why and answer the question, and keep asking why and finding answers at least six times. At first that might be all it takes, and as your ability to ask meaningful questions grows, you will learn to ask why and how in ways that lead to discovering deep rooted motivations that might even reshape the original desire. The outcome should also include more specific statements about what we want, which can help us communicate it to a team or others who can help us get it.

Consider the example of someone with a nicotine addiction. When the craving to smoke comes, how might understanding where that desire comes from help the individual learn to control it? Or, are you constantly looking for reasons to avoid certain types of situations? How might understanding why those situations are uncomfortable help you learn to face them? Or even when you are thinking of making large purchases or significant life changes, understanding what the root motivation is might shift the target of the future vision for ourselves. And if that future vision of yourself doesn't exist, there is your starting point, why?


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Getting Lost

Working in the software business for me has been a great opportunity to travel. Yes, you read that correctly, being a software engineer doesn't always mean you're a desk jockey. Though I do tend to spend most days reducing my posture to a that of a cooked macaroni, I am often traveling to meet with clients, partners and attend industry conferences.

Recently after a long spell of posture deterioration I had the chance to visit a customer near exotic Tullahoma Tennessee. Never heard of it? Well it's about an hour south of Nashville. You might not expect much from such a small town but everywhere I go I try to make a point of exploring the local area by looking up the best Strava segments and going for a run. And this time I wasn't disappointed.

Since daylight savings time ended (why do we still do this?) we've all noticed it getting dark a lot earlier but undeterred I took the chance to go for a run after finishing up work one day, headed to the nearest Strava segmen…

Keeping it Clean

What does the rock care if it is broken or chiseled or drilled, or painted or marked or scarred - it's just a rock. When you look at a cliff face or mountain what do you see? Just a pile of rocks? Let me tell you what I see, because I can hear you all so earnestly asking...

I see a landscape that has been meticulously crafted and constructed by a passionate and devoted artist. An artist who masterfully works in oils, water, sand, wind and colors and angles so precisely to reflect light and create shadows perfectly at any angle. More valuable than the greatest oil paintings, ornate silk Persian rugs or magnificent tapestries. To me a landscape of cliffs, rocks and mountains is a priceless work of art. But unlike the paintings, sculptures, and silk rugs that are forbidden to be touched, felt or walked on this, the ultimate work of art, is made to be experienced by every possible sense.

I feel a simple peace in natural landscapes. A peace that otherwise only comes in the most special …